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 1   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / Oct. 12 Benefit for Bach Week  Sep 17th, 2014, 4:35am 
Started by Nat Silverman | Last post by Nat Silverman
Bach Week Festival
P.O. Box 1832
Evanston, IL  60204-1832
(847) 269-9050 (General inquiries)
(800) 838-3006 (Tickets)
 
For Immediate Release
Attn: Music & Entertainment, Society/Benefits Editors
 
Harmonica Master Howard Levy to Headline
Oct. 12 Benefit for Bach Week
 
‘Bachtoberfest’ program to include
‘Dueling’ Organ and Harmonica
 
Fundraiser in Evanston Will Support
42nd Annual Spring Festival
 
German food, wine, beer,
and Baroque music
Editors: Photos are available. Email natsilv@aol.com or call (847) 328-4292.
 
EVANSTON, Ill., Sept. 10, 2014 — Globe-trotting, Grammy Award-winning harmonica virtuoso Howard Levy of Evanston will headline the Bach Week Festival’s fall Bachtoberfest fundraiser, to be held 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 12, at Nichols Concert Hall, 1490 Chicago Ave., Evanston, Ill.
 
Bachtoberfest will feature instrumental and choral music of German Baroque composer J. S. Bach, a silent auction, and German appetizers, desserts, wines, and beers.
 
Tickets are $50 each and are available at www.bachweek.org or by calling 800-838-3006.
 
Proceeds will benefit the 42nd annual Bach Week Festival slated for spring 2015 at Nichols Hall in Evanston and at Anderson Chapel at North Park University in Chicago. The festival will be a  collaboration between Bach Week and North Park’s school of music.
 
Organ vs. Harmonica
 
Levy, on harmonica, and Bach Week Festival music director Richard Webster, on organ, will perform Bach’s dramatic organ showpiece, the Toccata and Fugue in D Minor, BWV 565, famously heard in Walt Disney’s Fantasia. For this performance, Webster has christened it the “Dueling” Toccata and Fugue because he and Levy will trade passages throughout the piece.
 
Levy, who pioneered a method for producing a full range of notes from the traditional version of the harmonica, also will be heard in the Overture from Bach’s dance-inspired Orchestral Suite in B Minor, BWV 1067, where he'll play the solo flute part on harmonica. He'll play his own arrangement of “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring” from Cantata 147 and two movements from Bach’s Sonata No. 2 for flute and continuo, BWV 1034.
 
This will be Levy’s debut appearance at a Bach Week Festival event.
 
The North Park University Chamber Singers, directed by Julia Davids, will perform Bach’s motet “Lobet den Herrn, alle Heiden” (Praise the Lord, all nations), BWV 230. Davids is the university’s Stephen J. Hendrickson associate professor of music and its director of choral activities. She serves as music director of suburban Chicago’s 140-voice North Shore Choral Society and is artistic director of the Canadian Chamber Choir.
 
Award-winning young violinist Dawn Gingrich, who has performed internationally as a soloist and chamber musician, will play the Chaconne from Bach’s Partita No. 2 in D Minor, BWV 1004, for unaccompanied violin.
 
Although best known as a trailblazing harmonica player, Levy is also a composer and classically trained pianist.  His Concerto for Diatonic Harmonica and Orchestra, commissioned by the Illinois Philharmonic in 2001, was the first concerto ever composed for the familiar harmonica associated with folk, country, and blues music. Since then, he’s performed the concerto on multiple occasions in the US and Europe, including with the Chicago Sinfonietta.
 
Levy is a founding member of Béla Fleck and the Flecktones, the renowned instrumental ensemble with a style all its own. He won a 2011 Grammy Award for Best Instrumental Composition for “Life in Eleven,” which he wrote with bandleader and banjo player Fleck. As a member of the Flecktones, he won a 1996 Grammy for Best Pop Instrumental Performance for “The Sinister Minister.”
 
The London Observer proclaimed, “Howard Levy is a revelation; there are times when it is hard to believe he is playing only a harmonica.” His jazz CDs have received four-star reviews in Downbeat magazine.
 
A native New Yorker, Levy has lived in Evanston since 1972.
 
Webster to Run It
 
Bach Week’s Webster will run more than just Bachtoberfest’s music program. He will also run the Chicago Marathon that morning to raise money for the festival, as he has done in previous years. Webster, who played organ and harpsichord at Evanston’s first Bach Week in 1974, has been music director for every festival since 1975.
 
Bach Week is one of the Midwest’s premiere Baroque music festivals. The event enlists musicians from the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Lyric Opera of Chicago Orchestra, and other top-tier ensembles, while featuring some of the Chicago area’s finest instrumental and vocal soloists and distinguished guest artists from out of town.
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 2   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / King Solomon's Singers at Rockefeller Chapel 7/29  Jul 12th, 2014, 12:33pm 
Started by Tamara Ghattas | Last post by Tamara Ghattas
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Thursday, July 10, 2014
 
King Solomon's Singers
c/o Rockefeller Chapel
5850 S. Woodlawn Ave.
Chicago, IL 60637
 
Web: www.king-solomons-singers.org
 
E-mail: king.solomons.singers@gmail.com
 
King Solomon’s Singers will present RECORDARE: A RENAISSANCE PORTRAIT OF REMEMBRANCE AND LOSS. The program is part of a week of commemoration at historic Rockefeller Memorial Chapel of the centennial of the outbreak of World War 1, and it explores the effects of an event such as the Great War—separation, fear, loss, and of course death and remembrance—through the unique lens of Renaissance choral music. These themes are as old as humankind itself, and the composers of the Renaissance knew them well and expressed the attendant emotions in a deeply expressive yet controlled manner that makes for unusually rewarding listening. The ensemble will perform works of Josquin Desprez, William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, Heinrich Isaac, Tomás Luis de Victoria, and others, including portions of Victoria’s heartbreakingly beautiful Requiem Mass.
 
July 29, 2014, 7:30 PM
Rockefeller Memorial Chapel
5850 S. Woodlawn Ave., Chicago
 
Tickets are free, with suggested donation of $20/general, $10/student
 
 
About King Solomon's Singers
 
Founded in 2010, King Solomon’s Singers is an ensemble dedicated to the performance of Renaissance polyphony and chant. The members of the ensemble are professional and semiprofessional singers from the Chicago area—members of ensembles such as Chicago Chorale, Schola Antiqua of Chicago, The Oriana Singers, The Chicago Early Music Consort, and Chicago a cappella—who share a love of this particular repertoire.  
 
King Solomon's Singers' debut concert in August 2010 was recorded and released as Sacred and Profane Love. The ensemble's first full-length studio recording, Out of the Shadows: Sacred Music of Francisco Guerrero and Thomas Crecquillon, was released in July 2013. More information on the group's recordings is available at http://www.king-solomons-singers.org/Recordings.html.
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 3   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / Callipygian Players to perform at Byron Colby Barn  Dec 26th, 2013, 8:17am 
Started by Erin Cummisford | Last post by Erin Cummisford
Contact: Erin Cummisford
32400 N. Harris Road, Grayslake, IL 60030  
847-548-4062 x11
ecummisford@prairiecrossing.com  
       
For Immediate Release  
December 23, 2013
 
Callipygian Players perform “A Revolutionary’s Music” at Byron Colby Barn
 
GRAYSLAKE— Callipygian Players presents "A Revolutionary’s Music" at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 12 at the Byron Colby Barn in Grayslake. Admission is $18 for adults and is available at the door only (cash or check). To inspire early appreciation for the arts, children younger than 16 are admitted free.  
 
The Byron Colby Barn is located at 1561 Jones Point Road in Grayslake, inside the Prairie Crossing conservation community. From I-94, exit Route 120 west, turn south at Route 45, then right at Jones Point Road. Ample free parking is located adjacent to the Barn.  
 
In addition to his critical role in United States history, Thomas Jefferson was a man of cultured taste and an amateur violinist who was quite familiar with the latest European art and music. Embark on a journey back in time with “A Revolutionary’s Music”, featuring selections from Jefferson’s sizable music collection.  
 
Callipygian Players is an ensemble of Chicago’s finest period instrument musicians including Martin Davids, Director & Baroque violin; Craig Trompeter, cello; and David Schrader, harpsichord. Experience “A Revolutionary’s Music” with some of Jefferson’s favorite works by Antonio Vivaldi, Arcangelo Corelli, Burk Thumoth, Francesco Geminiani and Carlo Tessarini.
 
This performance is part of the 12th annual Early Music Series, featuring highly acclaimed musicians performing music from the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Additional upcoming performances in the Early Music Series include Such Sweete Melodie on Feb. 9, Secret of the Muses on Mar. 2, and Rook on Mar. 23.
 
Joel Spears is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Early Music Series, and an active lutenist and guitarist based in the Chicago area. He has performed as a soloist and with ensembles including Lyric Opera of Chicago, Chicago Opera Theater, Bella Voce, and Music of the Baroque. Joel is currently Lute Instructor at the Music Institute of Chicago.
 
Incredible music and architectural beauty combine to create a unique concert experience at the Byron Colby Barn. Audience members are welcome to bring a bottle of wine to share with friends during performances. Enjoy the gift of music in the intimate setting of a restored dairy barn. Information about upcoming performances is at www.prairiecrossing.com/bcbarn.
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 4   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / Marion Consort to perform at the Byron Colby Barn  Dec 2nd, 2013, 4:16pm 
Started by Erin Cummisford | Last post by Erin Cummisford
Contact:
Erin Cummisford
847-548-4062 x11
ecummisford@prairiecrossing.com  
32400 N. Harris Road, Grayslake, IL 60030
 
For Immediate Release  
November 25, 2013
 
Marion Consort to perform holiday concert at Byron Colby Barn
 
GRAYSLAKE— Celebrate the holiday season with Marion Consort as they perform "Sing We All Noel" at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 15 at the Byron Colby Barn in Grayslake. Admission is $18 for adults and is available at the door only (cash or check). To inspire early appreciation for the arts, children younger than 16 are admitted free.  
 
This performance is part of the 12th annual Early Music Series, featuring highly acclaimed musicians performing music from the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Audience members are welcome to bring a bottle of wine to share with friends during performances.
 
The “Sing We All Noel” program features rare historical gems from the Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods. Chicago’s premier early music vocal ensemble performs a cappella Christmas carols from the past, as well as familiar holiday favorites. This one of a kind performance by Marion Consort (Amy Bearden, Melissa Curtis, Chris Henricks, Molly Pufall-Brown, Hans Royal-Hedinger, Adam Schleinzer, and Kyle Shiver-Simpson) includes music by well-known composers including Byrd, Victoria, Hassler, and Monteverdi.  
 
Joel Spears is the Founder and Artistic Director of the Early Music Series, and an active lutenist and guitarist based in the Chicago area. He has performed as a soloist and with ensembles including Lyric Opera of Chicago, Chicago Opera Theater, Bella Voce, and Music of the Baroque. Joel is currently Lute Instructor at the Music Institute of Chicago.
 
Incredible music and architectural beauty combine to create a unique concert experience at the Byron Colby Barn. The Byron Colby Barn is located at 1561 Jones Point Road in Grayslake, inside the Prairie Crossing conservation community. From I-94, exit Route 120 west, turn south at Route 45, then right at Jones Point Road. Ample free parking is located adjacent to the Barn. Information about upcoming performances is at www.prairiecrossing.com/bcbarn.
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 5   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / NSCAE Baroque Music for Christmas Tide  Dec 2nd, 2013, 2:11pm 
Started by Carlos Figueredo | Last post by Carlos Figueredo
North Shore Chamber Arts Ensemble  
 
Carlos Figueredo
847.475.0203, 773.451.6701
Carlos.figueredo@sbcglobal.net
Chamber-arts-ensemble.org
 
 
BAROQUE MUSIC FOR CHRISTMAS TIDE
 
Sunday, December 8, 2013 at 4.00 p.m.
 
Glencoe, Illinois, October 1, 2013–THE FIRST CONCERT OF THE 2013 -2014 SEASON OF THE NORTH SHORE CHAMBER ARTS ENSEMBLE – BAROQUE MUSIC FOR CHRISTMAS TIDE -- WILL BE PRESENTED ON DECEMBER 8 AT THE NORTH SHORE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 213 HAZEL AVENUE, GLENCOE, IL 60022.  TICKET PRICE IS $35/GENERAL ADMISSION, $25/SENIORS AND STUDENTS. 2-FOR-1 WFMT BENEFIT HONORED WITH ONLINE PURCHASE.
 
FOR FURTHER DETAILS OR TO PURCHASE TICKETS VISIT chamber-arts-ensemble.org OR CALL NORTH SHORE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH AT 847-835-1227 MONDAY TO FRIDAY FROM 9.00 AM TO 12.30 PM.
 
THE CONCERT PROGAM INCLUDES:
 
·  CHORALE FROM CANTATA 147 OF J.S BACH
 
·  CONCERTO GROSSO NO. 8, OP 6 IN G MINOR BY ARCANGELO CORELLI
 
·  CHRISTMAS CONCERTO BY GIUSEPPE TORELLI
 
·  GLORIA IN D MAJOR RV 589 BY ANTONIO VIVALDI
 
—THIS IS A PROGRAM THAT WILL NOT ONLY ENTERTAIN BUT EDUCATE AND DELIGHT—
 
THE MISSION OF NORTH SHORE CHAMBER ARTS ENSEMBLE IS TO BRING EXCELLENT CHAMBER MUSIC AT AFFORDABLE PRICES TO THE NORTH SHORE AND THE CHICAGO AREA.
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 6   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / Early Music Now Presents Pallade Musica  Oct 29th, 2013, 2:15pm 
Started by Charles Q. Sullivan | Last post by Charles Q. Sullivan
Early Music Now
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
 
Contact: Charles Q. Sullivan   |    414.225.3113  |  info@earlymusicnow.org
 
 
Early Music Now Presents Baroque Competition Winner
 
Milwaukee’s presenter of Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque music from around the world prides itself on promoting not only well-established ensembles, but also young artists new to the field. Early Music Now continues its 27th season with a young ensemble from Montreal that is off to a fast start in developing their following.
 
Pallade Musica brings together four of Montreal’s most promising early music performers. Grand Prize winners at the Early Music America Baroque Performance Competition in New York, October 2012, the quartet consists of Tanya LaPerrière, Baroque violon, Elinor Frey, Baroque cello, Esteban La Rotta, theorbo, and Mylène Bélanger, harpsichord. As part of their prize, these musicians won a handful of concert opportunities in the United States: Indianapolis, Seattle, Pittsburgh, and Milwaukee – presented by Early Music Now with assistance from Early Music America.
 
Their Milwaukee performance will take place at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 914 East Knapp Street on Saturday, November 16th at 5:00. The concert will be preceded by a lecture at 4:00, and followed by a reception celebrating Early Music Now’s 27th Anniversary.
 
The program is titled “Terreno e vago,” taking inspiration from two Italian words that can be used to characterize emotional effects found in Italian Baroque music.  Terreno represents the earth – that which is profane, secular, regular, and defined. The contrasting vago is music of reflection – that which is irregular, spiritual, sacred, elusive, and vague.
 
The Italians relished adventurous nuance, extreme dynamics, and the chance to demonstrate skillful playing. These qualities are demonstrated in this concert by Dario Castello’s (1590-1658) dazzling sonatas in stile moderno, a style emanating from Italy that utilized expressive harmonies and theatrical effects, often linked to a specific instrument. The program includes representative music of many relatively unknown early Baroque composers, such as Giovanni Paolo Cima (1570-1630), Francesco Rognoni (d. 1626), and Alessandro Piccinini (1566-1638); as well as sonatas and canzonas by Tarquinio Merula (1595-1665) and Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757).
 
Tickets for this 5:00 concert are $25-$40 for adults and seniors, $10-$20 for students, and are available online at EarlyMusicNow.org, by phone at 414.225.3113, or from Early Music Now at 759 N Milwaukee St – Ste 420, Milwaukee, WI 53202.  Groups of 10 or more receive a 20% discount on ticket prices.
 
An abbreviated version of this concert will also be performed at UW-Parkside on Friday evening, November 15th, as the conclusion of an Early Music Now collaborative residency with the Music Department, which also includes anafternoon lecture demonstration. Contact the UW-Parkside Box Office at 262-595-2564 for more information.
 
Early Music Now is an Affiliate Member of the United Performing Arts Fund.
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 7   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / Heinavanker, “Ancient Songs, Chants, & Hymns”  Sep 30th, 2013, 3:47pm 
Started by Charles Q. Sullivan | Last post by Charles Q. Sullivan
Early Music Now
 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
 
Contact: Charles Q. Sullivan  |  414.225.3113  |  info@earlymusicnow.org
 
 
Early Music Now Presents Heinavanker, “Ancient Songs, Chants, & Hymns”
 
Milwaukee’s premier presenter of Medieval, Renaissance, and early Baroque music, Early Music Now, kicks off its official 27th season at 5:00 pm Saturday, October 12th at the historic St. Joseph Center Chapel, 1501 South Layton Boulevard, with a program of Estonian choral music performed by the young Estonian vocal ensemble, Heinavanker (heinavanker.ee).
 
“Ancient Songs, Chants, and Hymns” highlights Estonian folk hymns, along with a rare glimpse into the ancient tradition of runic songs, interspersed with movements from several 14th-century settings of the Latin Mass. The seven-voice choir, directed by composer Margo Kolar, explores early sacred music and ancient Estonian traditions in this a cappella presentation.
 
The rich, colorful and imaginative texts of these songs provide a welcome supplement to the scarce knowledge available about Estonia’s ancient history. The origin of the folk hymn tradition is still obscure, but there is enough evidence to assume a spiritual connection to the movement of 18th-century Herrnhut (Moravian) Brethren, which triggered a powerful wave of pietism among the rural population. The other influence most probably originated from the population of Swedish settlers on Estonian islands and coastal areas – their strong cultural identity most certainly had an impact on the way their neighboring Estonians perceived the wider world. In fact, one could claim that the melismatic character of folk hymns derives directly from Scandinavian folk music, as the runic songs (regilaul) – the old songs of Finno-Ugric origin – obviously belong to a different cultural context.
 
The geographical location of Estonia has left its specific mark on the history of this small fraction of a nation. This “strategically attractive” piece of land has witnessed the conflicting political interests of Vikings, Germans, Swedes, Danes, Slavic nations, and others. Estonia is also a cross-road between the influences of Eastern and Western Christian churches. Already at the beginning of the second millennium, the local tribes with their animistic world view and ancestor worship constituted a barrier to the expanding influence of the Popes of Rome as well as to the Orthodox patriarchs. During the recent 50 years, as part of the Soviet Union, atheism has been the main religion in Estonia, aiming to blur the memory of Estonian identity as well as the influence of the Christian Church.
 
The name “Heinavanker” originates from Hieronymos Bosch’s Haywain Triptych. On this strange painting, there’s a huge stack of hay rolling through a land laboring in acquisitiveness towards destruction. In the midst of this, there is music, and a snide demon and a praying angel try to influence the musicians.
 
St. Joseph Center Chapel is the perfect venue for this concert, as its acoustics provide an exceptional environment for experiencing sacred music. Since the 1970s, this Milwaukee landmark has been a favorite setting for choral and instrumental concerts.  The chapel was dedicated in 1917, and is Romanesque in style and cruciform in design. It is 200 feet long and 90 feet wide at its greatest breadth, with the dome rising 70 feet above the sanctuary.  Features include 15 kinds of marble, 115 Austrian stained-glass windows, and several mosaics.  
 
Tickets for this 5:00 concert are $25-$40 for adults and seniors, $10-$20 for students, and are available online at EarlyMusicNow.org, by phone at 414.225.3113, or from Early Music Now at 759 N Milwaukee St – Ste 420, Milwaukee, WI 53202.
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 8   Early Music / News and General Discussion / Aston Magna Music Festival 2013 Season  Apr 22nd, 2013, 4:09am 
Started by Charlie Siedenburg | Last post by Charlie Siedenburg
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Aston Magna Music Festival Press Rep, Charlie Siedenburg, 551-655-0968
 
ASTON MAGNA FESTIVAL’S 41ST SEASON INCLUDES AN APPEARANCE AT HISTORIC MAHAIWE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER; CONCERTS TO INCLUDE MUSIC OF BACH, MARAIS AND MONTEVERDI
 
(Great Barrington, MA)  Aston Magna’s 2013 season marks its 41st year, with concerts at Bard College at Simon’s Rock, at Brandeis University, and at Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, from June 13 through July 13.
 
Coming off a highly successful 40th Anniversary season with renewed dedication to Aston Magna’s mission of presenting engaging concerts of music from the late 16th to early 19th century, the Festival will include a June 29 concert at the landmark Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center in downtown Great Barrington, MA.  
 
The season, which will begin on the weekend of June 13-15, will be under the musical direction of Daniel Stepner, Artistic Director and violinist, and will feature many of our most prominent artists, including sopranos Sharon Baker, Dominique Labelle, and Kristen Watson; clarinetist Eric Hoeprich; oboist Stephen Hammer; gambist Laura Jeppesen; theorbist Catherine Liddell; harpischordist Peter Sykes; and trumpeter Josh Cohen.
 
This summer’s five Aston Magna Festival programs will be performed at Slosberg Auditorium at Brandeis University in Waltham, MA, on Thursday evenings, June 13, 20 and 27, and July 4 and 11 with concerts beginning at 8:00 p.m.  The concerts can be heard on Friday evenings, June 14, 21 and 28, and July 5 and 12 at 8:00 p.m. in the air-conditioned auditorium of the Olin Humanities Building on the main campus of Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York. Four of the concerts on Saturdays, June 15 and 22 and July 6 and 13, will take place at the Daniel Arts Center at Bard College at Simon’s Rock in Great Barrington, MA, at 6:00 p.m. The concert on Saturday, June 29 will be performed at The Mahaiwe at 8:00 p.m.  A pre-concert lecture by Daniel Stepner will be featured one hour before all concerts, and audience members are invited to “Meet the Artists” post-concert.  Audience members are invited to a wine and cheese reception following all concerts at the Daniel Arts Center and the June 29 Mahaiwe concert.
 
For the first concert weekend, on June 13, 14, and 15, clarinetist Eric Hoeprich will introduce the unfamiliar but hauntingly beautiful chalumeau. The program will highlight this once popular instrument, a relative of both the recorder and the clarinet, in works by Handel, Vivaldi, and others, including Holy Roman Emperor Joseph I. Stephen Hammer on baroque oboe, and Kristen Watson, soprano, will also join Mr. Stepner, who will lead a small ensemble.
 
The second concert will be devoted to music of Johann Sebastian Bach for harpsichord and violin, and will feature all six sonatas for violin and harpsichord. It will be performed on June 20, 21, and 22. Violinist Daniel Stepner and keyboardist Peter Sykes will perform.
 
During the third weekend, June 27, 28, and 29, the Saturday evening performance will take place at the Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center at 8:00. The concert will present music by Bach and French composer Marin Marais, whose life was portrayed in the film Tous les matins du monde. Soprano Dominique Labelle will solo in works by Marais as well as in Bach’s “Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen.” The second Brandenburg concerto will also be performed. The ensemble will include gambist Laura Jeppesen, theorbist Catherine Lidell, baroque trumpeter Josh Cohen, and a chamber orchestra led by Mr. Stepner.
 
Monteverdi madrigals will be performed on July 4, 5, and 6, together with those of one of his predecessors, Giaches de Wert. Masterful and imaginative musical settings from the 16th and early 17th century will be the fare with Aston Magna’s Madrigal Singers performing.
 
For the final concert weekend, July 11, 12, and 13, Aston Magna explores the musical library of America’s third president, Thomas Jefferson, illuminated by excerpts from his writings.  An accomplished musician himself, Jefferson collected a good number of musical gems, including music of Corelli, Mozart, J.C. Bach, Maria Cosway and Francis Hopkinson.  Performing will be soprano Sharon Baker, violinist Daniel Stepner, and harpsichordist Michael Sponseller.
 
In conjunction with the first two concert weekends, period instrument workshops will be offered at Brandeis University.  On June 9-14, workshop classes and private instruction will be offered by Mr. Hammer, oboe, and Mr. Hoeprich, clarinet, exploring Mozart's use of wind instruments in The Magic Flute.  In the June 16-21 workshop, Mr. Stepner will offer sessions on Bach's works for unaccompanied violin, geared to both modern and baroque violinists. For more information, please consult the website www.brandeis.edu/summer/music/.
 
For information or to order tickets to the concerts at the Olin Auditorium on the main campus of Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, NY, please phone 845-758-7887. Individual tickets purchased in advance for concerts at Olin Auditorium are $35 ($30/seniors).  Students with valid full-time student ID, or under the age of 25, may purchase up to two $5 student rush tickets on the day of the performance. Student rush tickets are subject to availability. Tickets to these concerts are not available online.
 
Tickets to the June 29 concert at the Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center can be purchased by calling 413-528-0100 or on line at www.mahaiwe.org.  Audience members are invited to a wine and cheese reception following the June 29 Mahaiwe concert.
 
Subscriptions to the Festival are available at Slosberg Auditorium, Brandeis University, and at Daniel Arts Center, Bard College at Simon’s Rock.  Single tickets purchased in advance for the Slosberg Auditorium concerts are $30 ($25/seniors); subscription tickets are discounted at $5, $4, $3 and $2 per ticket, for 5, 4, 3, and 2 concerts, respectively.  Individual tickets purchased in advance for concerts at the Daniel Arts Center are $35 ($30/seniors); subscription tickets are discounted at $5, $4, and $3 per ticket, for 4, 3, and 2 concerts respectively.  Buying in advance also saves you an additional $5 over the price of individual tickets at the door.
 
Student rush tickets at $10 are available at the door at all concerts. Aston Magna encourages parents to bring the kids! Children 6 to 16 are free, two per each paid adult ticket at Daniel Arts Center.
 
Tickets or information to concerts at the Daniel Arts Center and at the Slosberg Auditorium may be ordered by calling 413-528-3595, (out of area 800-875-7156) or on line at www.astonmagna.org.    
 
Aston Magna Music Festival is supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council and Friends of Aston Magna.  Aston Magna concerts at Bard are made possible, in part, by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.
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 9   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / Oak Park Concert Chorale Spring Concert  Apr 1st, 2013, 4:02am 
Started by Linda Nelson | Last post by Linda Nelson
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
 
Contact:
Linda Nelson
Oak Park Concert Chorale
Communications Coordinator
924 N. Oak Park Avenue
Oak Park, IL 60302 - 1324
Phone: 708-383-4742
info@OakParkConcertChorale.org
  www.OakParkConcertChorale.org
 
Oak Park Concert Chorale, Paul Lindblad, Director, Presents
 
A cappella Joy
 
Oak Park, IL, - March 29, 2013 -  The Oak Park Concert Chorale (OPCC), conducted by director Paul Lindblad, will present A cappella Joy on Sunday, April 21, 2013 at 4:00pm, at  Grace Lutheran Church, 7300 West Division Street, River Forest, IL. General Admission is $18; Seniors/Students are $10. Group Rates are available. To order tickets, call 708.383.4742 or email info@OakParkConcertChorale.org. For more information or to order tickets online, visit our website at www.OakParkConcertChorale.org.
 
OPCC remains dedicated to performing varied and exciting music.
The Oak Park Concert Chorale spring concert spans seven hundred fifty years with a cappella choral music from six nations. The  concert features many Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque era compositions.
 
One of the highlights will be “Befiehl du deine Wege” by Johann Christoph Altnickol. Altnickol was a German composer and organist who studied composition with and was highly regarded by J. S. Bach, even marrying one of Bach’s daughters.
 
Contrasting settings of the “Kyrie” by Machaut, Hassler  and Vaughn Williams show the evolution of musical interpretation of this text through the ages.
 
A selection of Renaissance and Baroque madrigals and motets by Gasparini, Peurel, Gallus, Weelkes, Josquin and Passereau will round out our musical history tour.
 
We hope you will be able to join us for this evening of luxurious and inspirational choral sounds.
 
About Oak Park Concert Chorale: One of the Midwest's leading choral ensembles featuring both a cappella and accompanied performances. The Chorale is comprised of a diverse group of individuals and performs in and around Oak Park, Illinois. Led by Director Paul Lindblad, the Chorale offers highly artistic performances of varied and exciting choral music.
 
About Paul Lindblad: Paul Lindblad received his undergraduate degree in Music Education and a Master's Degree in Church Music from Concordia University, River Forest, Illinois. Mr. Lindblad earned a Kodály Certificate from Silver Lake College, Manitowoc, Wisconsin. He has studied with Paul Christiansen, world famous choral conductor; and Katinka Daniel, International Kodály music education specialist. Mr. Lindblad has done extensive studies in organ performance, vocal technique, and conducting under the mentorships of Victor Hildner and Douglas Neslund. Mr. Lindblad currently conducts the Oak Park Concert Chorale and St. John Choristers (formerly Paul Lindblad Choristers). He is the Director of Liturgics at St. John Lutheran Church in Forest Park, the music teacher at Walther Lutheran Academy in Forest Park, and is the former Choirmaster at St. Gregory Episcopal Boychoir School in Chicago.
 
Oak Park Concert Chorale presents A cappella Joy
Sunday, April 21, 2013, 4:00 pm,
Grace Lutheran Church, 7300 W. Division Street, River Forest, IL
General Admission is $18; Seniors/Students $10. Children Kindergarten age and younger are free. Group discounts are available.
To order tickets, call 708.383.4742 or email info@OakParkConcertChorale.org.
For more information or to order tickets online, visit our website at www.OakParkConcertChorale.org
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 10   Early Music / Chicago Area Early Music / Chicago Bach Project Bach Mass in B Minor March 27  Mar 11th, 2013, 4:21pm 
Started by Nat Silverman | Last post by Nat Silverman
Soli Deo Gloria, Inc.
800 Roosevelt Road, A-100
Glen Ellyn, Illinois 60137
Office: 630-984-4300
sdgmusic.org
 
For Immediate Release  
Attn: Music, Arts & Entertainment Editors
 
Chicago Bach Project to Present J.S. Bach's
Monumental ‘Mass in B Minor’ on March 27
at St. Vincent de Paul Church
 
John Nelson to Conduct Renowned Soloists,
Choir, and Orchestra in Newest Installment
of Sacred Masterworks Cycle
 
Jane Henschel, International Mezzo-Soprano,
to Make Chicago Debut
 
Soprano Nicole Cabell, Chicago-Based Opera Star,
to Make Return Appearance in Soli Deo Gloria’s
Easter-Season Series
 
Editors: Photos are available. Please email natsilv@aol.com or call (847) 328-4292
 
Glen Ellyn IL, March 7, 2013 — The Chicago Bach Project will present the third installment in its three-part cycle of J.S. Bach’s monumental sacred masterworks when Grammy award-winner John Nelson conducts Bach’s Mass in B Minor at 8 p.m. on March 27 at St. Vincent de Paul Church, 1010 W. Webster Ave., Chicago, presented by Glen Ellyn, Ill., based Soli Deo Gloria.
 
Soloists will include soprano Nicole Cabell, Chicago-based international opera star; American-born, Europe-based dramatic mezzo-soprano Jane Henschel; distinguished American tenor Stanford Olsen; and English bass-baritone Matthew Brook. Musical forces will include the Chicago Bach Choir and Orchestra. Chorus master is Donald Nally, former chorus master at the Lyric Opera of Chicago.
 
Henschel, an opera singer and concert soloist of international stature, will make her Chicago debut in the March 27 performance.
 
Henschel has made 100 appearances with England's Royal Opera at Covent Garden.  Recent major U.S. appearances include the Philadelphia Orchestra’s 2012 concert staging of Richard Strauss’s opera Elektra. The Philadelphia Inquirer said, “Jane Henschel’s mezzo, extremely powerful and communicative, was the rarest of pleasures. Here is a singer for whom all musical decision flows from the text — with a low range that seems to come with its own resonance chamber.”
 
Nelson says he hasn't worked with Henschel before, but has frequently heard her sing. “She is a consummate musician and a very sensitive singer,” he says.
 
Cabell and Olsen sang in the Chicago Bach Project’s 2011 St. Matthew Passion. Brook sang in the 2012 St. John Passion.
 
“Nicole Cabell is really one of the most gorgeous soprano voices of our time,” says Nelson, who has conducted at many of the world’s major opera houses, including the Metropolitan and Chicago Lyric Operas. “Hers is just a golden, golden instrument.”
 
Nelson says Brook has “an extraordinary intelligence behind his singing.  He has a passion that’s also extraordinary.  He has this music in his head and in his heart.”
 
The conductor calls Olsen “one of the great lyric tenors of our time.  His voice is perfection in this kind of music.”
 
A pinnacle of western classical music, Bach’s Mass in B Minor, BWV 232, has been described by music scholars and critics as “remarkable,” “profound” and “a cathedral in sound.”  The work consists of more than two dozen choral and solo numbers — choruses, arias, and duets. Some of the movements feature violin and other instruments in semi-solo “obbligato” roles. Bach wrote the component parts of his Mass in B Minor from 1723 until just before his death in 1750.  He never lived to hear the complete work. National Public Radio commentator Ted Libbey wrote that the Mass in B Minor “is as lofty in design, scope and expression as anything written by the hand of man.”  
 
Nelson, who has conducted most of the world’s great orchestras, has made interpreting the great sacred choral literature central to his work. He has conducted the Mass in B Minor in Paris, San Francisco, Dallas, and Lisbon, Portugal, among many other locations.
 
The March 27 concert will be Nelson’s first Mass in B Minor in Chicago.
 
“My own vision of the work is at once dramatic and at once spiritual,” Nelson said in a recent interview with Soli Deo Gloria. He says he seeks to “reproduce the character of this music as it was heard back in Bach’s day, to make it as spiritual an experience as possible.”
 
Joseph A. LoSchiavo, president and CEO of Soli Deo Gloria, Inc., says the Chicago Bach Project offers concertgoers the opportunity to experience “sacred music in a sacred space” at the highest professional level of musicianship. “The visual splendor of St. Vincent de Paul provides audiences with an alternative environment to a concert hall or auditorium. It’s a setting more in keeping with where the Mass would have been performed in Bach’s day.”  
 
Tickets and Information
 
Single ticket prices for the Mass in B Minor are $40 to $75. Tickets are available online at ChicagoBachProject.org or by calling (630) 984-4300.
 
Chicago Bach Project
 
The Mass in B Minor is the much-anticipated third installment of the Chicago Bach Project’s rotating concert cycle in which one of Bach’s three epic sacred masterworks will be staged each year during the Easter season. The series launched in April 2011 with the St. Matthew Passion. The St. John Passion was performed in April 2012.  Both of those concerts were presented at St. Vincent de Paul.
 
The Chicago initiative is modeled on the decade-long series that Nelson conducted at Paris’s Notre Dame Cathedral with the Ensemble Orchestral de Paris.
Nelson’s 2006 performance of the Mass in B Minor in Paris was released internationally on DVD that same year on the Virgin Classics label to an enthusiastic reception from critics and record collectors alike. Among the soloists was mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato.
 
Nelson’s many awards include a Grammy for his recording of Handel’s Semele on the Deutsche Grammophon label and France’s Diapason d’Or de l’Année award for Berlioz’s Béatrice et Bénédict on Erato.
 
The Chicago Bach Project is organized and supported by Soli Deo Gloria, Inc., a Glen Ellyn, Ill., nonprofit organization co-founded by Nelson in 1993. Soli Deo Gloria’s mission is to enhance, promote, and preserve classical sacred music in the biblical tradition, at the highest level. The organization sponsors concerts around the world and recordings on CD and DVD while commissioning new sacred music from the world’s leading composers.
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